Budapest Spring Festival Budapest Fringe Festival Café Budapest Festival
 

On the threshold of world fame -
Young pianists at the Spring Festival

Feb

4

“I was born in the late seventies, in Brasov, Romania, at the foot of the hills. Which may be the reason why later I was so attracted to waterfronts. My parents are also musicians; my mother sings, and my father is one the best pianist and greatest musicians I’ve ever heard. At night they would perform in restaurants and hotels, and I had the privilege of listening to my father’s playing from underneath the piano,” writes Mihaela Ursuleasa, Romanian pianist of explosive talent in her curriculum vitae.

She was only seventeen when she won the 1995 Clara Haskil Piano Competition. Her sophisticated technique, the liveliness of her playing have been noted the world over, and she is considered the heiress of such Romanian pianists as Dinu Lipatti and Radu Lupu. “I like to build my solo programmes on contrasts; I like to play Bartók after Mozart, love Scarlatti in the company of Liszt, Brahms next to Prokofiev.” On 18 March, in the Uránia National Film Theatre, she will juxtapose Bartók and Paul Constantinescu, authors working under the spell of folk music, with Schumann.
Two days later, at the same venue, János Balázs, who finished third at the last International Franz Liszt Piano Competition, will summon the spirit of a great master: the programme entitled In memoriam Cziffra György includes pieces that require extraordinary virtuosity and were once favourites at Cziffra’s solo concerts. As a special treat, we can hear Cziffra’s paraphrase of Johann Strauss Jr.’s The Blue Danube Waltz, the performance of which few pianists undertake.
Percussion Day in the Palace of Arts will feature a veritable legion of pianists. Zoltán Kocsis and Ingrid Fliter will play Bartók, while the chords of a fantastic piece by Stravinsky, The Wedding will be struck by Gábor Farkas, József Balog and István Lajkó, who represent a generation that has gained increasing international notice in recent years, as well as by Fülöp Ránki, one of the youngest promises.